Beyerdynamic iDX160iE – An Every Man’s IEM

Disclaimer: Beyerdynamic is a website advertiser and we got the sample free of charge.

box HFN Lieven round kader

 

 

 

A Complicated Name

Beyerdynamic iDX160iE. There I said it. From now on it will be called the DX160 and everyone will agree. Understood? I’m kidding, what’s in a name. Right?

The DX160 (see I did it) isn’t the newest of IEMs on the market but I only got to listen to it at Canjam Europe. I remember liking it at the Beyerdynamic booth and so I asked them to send me over a sample for a more detailed listen. I’m not the biggest fan of universal IEMs because of most of them either don’t fit or don’t seal well, making a lot of them sound really bad in my ears.

The 99€ ($104) DX160 fit me right from the start. It’s a rather small IEM and it weighs only 53gr making it a non out of your ear falling IEM, the kind I like. As you all know getting a good fit with IEMS is crucial for getting good sound. The form factor of the DX160 in combination with the supplied tips makes it a perfect fitting monitor for me. But how’s the cable?

The DX160 is a normal cable down wearing IEM and it uses a FLAT type of cable. Remember I didn’t like the flat cable on the Brainwavz S5, but this cable is different. It’s more flexible, lighter, tangles less and it isn’t as wide or thick. While these are “cable down” IEMs, the light cable doesn’t bother you during listening and it doesn’t pull the monitors out of your ear. I wouldn’t recommend this type for doing sports though. The DX160 comes with an extension cable and a splitter so a friend can join in on your listening session. I’ve always found that a weird thing to do but I see kids doing it on the train all the time. The plug at the end of the cable is a 45° angled 1/8″ (3,5 mm) mini stereo jack plug where “tensile forces are absorbed better”. The Y-split is long and doesn’t bother me at all where other cables can be quite annoying when touching your chin and neck.

Build quality of the DX160 is pretty good although I didn’t expect anything else from Beyerdynamic, a German company. Funny thing is these were made in China actually but it features full-metal-housings, attractive anodized surfaces and shiny aluminum rings. They look tiny and I find them quite sexy looking. At the same time they have this business look I appreciate in audio gear.

I hardly ever mention the accessories but the DX160 comes in a great little case. I don’t tend to like these zip cases but this one just works for me. The DX160 is Apple certified but it of course also does Android and other sources. Apple certified you say? I tried listening to the DX160 straight out of my brand new iPod Classic 160 and the 3.5mm plug just couldn’t make good contact and I only got half the sound. On all other devices I tried the DX160 on, I didn’t have any issues but a certified Apple unit that doesn’t work on a Classic, hmm, I don’t know.

 

Sound

If you check Beyerdynamic’s DX160 shop page you will see they describe these IEMs the following way:

“Efficient, powerful neodymium drivers deliver fantastic sound, making this headphone one of the best in its class: deep low-end, clear mids and transparent treble set the iDX 160 iE apart from its competitors.”

As we all know that’s the marketing division talking. Let’s see what they really sound like. Or are they right?

Read all about it on the next page

Beyerdynamic iDX160iE – An Every Man’s IEM
4 (80%) 3 vote[s]

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Lieven is living in Europe and he's the leader of the gang. He's running Headfonia as a side project next to his full time day job in Digital Marketing & Consultancy. He's a big fan of tube amps and custom inear monitors and has published hundreds of product reviews over the years.

11 Comments

  • Reply November 27, 2014

    Vaibhav Pisal

    was looking forward to this

    • Reply November 27, 2014

      Headfonia_L.

      And now? 🙂

      • Reply November 27, 2014

        Vaibhav Pisal

        wanted something budget from beyer to check their house sound.

        disappointed it strays from their treble.

  • Reply November 27, 2014

    johthor

    Very nice review Lieven. Could you compare the DX160 to the SE215 as they are both in the same price range. Thanks

    • Reply November 28, 2014

      Headfonia_L.

      Long time since I heard the 215. The Shure is a classic and it’s one of the better IEMs if you like warm and bassy sound. The DX160 isn’t that warm and bassy

  • Reply December 5, 2014

    Rasmus Horn

    Great review! 🙂

    I listened to the DX120 and DX160 at IFA and to my ears the DX160 simply had too much bass. The DX120 had much better clarity and a more neutral sound. DX160 and Momentum IEM are going to be competing with eachother.

    I can see why they tuned the DX160 to be more like a “street” sound for most modern music, because they need to sell these at airports etc. But the DX120 was the best performer to my ears.

    • Reply December 5, 2014

      Headfonia_L.

      Thanks for stopping by Rasmus. Any news on a H6 successor?

      • Reply December 8, 2014

        Rasmus Horn

        No, but have you seen the portable BeoPlay H2?

        • Reply December 8, 2014

          Headfonia_L.

          Seen yes, heard no. worth it?

          • Reply December 8, 2014

            Rasmus Horn

            H6 is the technically better headphone with better resolution and larger soundstage. H2 is tuned for those who think the H6 lacks bass and is designed as an on-ear portable headphone. I think you should give it a listen if you get a chance.

            • Reply December 8, 2014

              dalethorn

              Since it’s a B&O item and B&O doesn’t sell cheap, there must be a reason it’s 1/2 the price of the H6 – can’t be that cheap just because of ‘urban’ tuning.

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