Centrance M8 LX Brief Impression

I don’t know if I’m going to get a review unit from Centrance and when Headfonia Store’s M8 order will arrive, but a good friend and a customer to the store brought me the M8 that he received from the pre-order for me to play around with and I felt excited about the new device from Centrance I decided to go ahead with a brief impression article.

 

ABOUT THE M8 LX

The Centrance M8 comes with several input/output configurations. The one I am using at the moment is the LX version which is the version without the i-Device compatibility (which is actually one of the big selling point about the M8). I had some listening time to the i-Devices compatible version in Tokyo and I thought that the LX version shared mostly the same sound signature with the non-LX.

For this impression, I’m feeding the M8 LX from my MacBook through the USB connection using Oyaide’s fancy Continental S5 USB cable. This version also comes with a Toslink input though it doesn’t seem to be working with the Astell & Kern AK100 and the Fostex HP-A7 DAC (via its digital optical out). I think this particular unit may have a faulty toslink connection.

 

SOUND IMPRESSIONS

Earlier this week I was writing in the Q & A session about the fact that all i-Devices DAC/Amp units lack the proper “oompf” to drive a full size. That includes the Fostex HP-P1, ADL X1 (from my brief impression in Japan), VentureCraft’s GoDapX, and the Sony PHA-1. Most of them can produce sufficient loudness levels, but not quite with the dynamics that you can get with a separate portable amp unit. Well I have to make an exception to that statement, since the M8 is extremely powerful and easily drives either the Sennheiser HD600 and the Audez’e LCD-3 that I’m using for this impression. Testing the 4-pin balanced out with the AKG K1000, I get a moderately good volume level that’s usable in a quiet room at maximum volume and maximum gain. What I didn’t expect was when I plugged the K1000 on the 1/4″ out (using an XLR to TRS adapter), I get the same volume level as directly to the 4-pin out. I don’t know how the balanced out is wired but it looks like the gain is set to be the same on the TRS and the XLR out. It’s just that the sound is more spacious and less forward with the balanced out.

The M8 thing is a beast as I discovered it was able to drive both the LCD-3 and AKG K1000 simultaneously without a noticeable drop in sonics, with a good level of impact and dynamics too. At the more sensitive side of the spectrum is the Sennheiser IE800 and the Sony EX1000 that the M8 drives nicely at low gain with good volume control range and extremely low noise floor (the IE800 is 16Ω, EX1000 32Ω).

Regarding the controls at the back, aside from the self-explanatory gain setting, I explored the treble and bass controls as well as the output impedance settings. Treble control adds very little treble quantity in contrast to the bass boost which makes quite a boom-boom at maximum setting. I didn’t quite like the effect produced by both the treble and bass boost toggles. The boost created an unnatural bump in bass and spike in treble that doesn’t blend well with the rest of the frequency curve.

The impedance setting changes the frequency response depending on the headphones attached between the 1Ω, 2Ω, and 11Ω settings. Starting with the LCD-3, I find that the 1Ω impedance setting gives the cleanest sound (for some reason) while the 11Ω boost a tiny bit of the bass quantity perhaps around 1dB. With the 300Ω Senn, I don’t think I hear any difference between the impedance settings. With the IE800, the 1Ω impedance setting lowers the volume output compared to the 11Ω, gives a cleaner sound, and again is less bassy than the 11Ω.

I tested the USB input to take files up to 24/176.4 without a problem. I believe the M8 should be able to take in files up to 192kHz but I don’t have one around at the moment.

 

 

SOUND COMPARISONS

Since the M8 LX that I have here doesn’t support i-Devices playback, I had some difficulty trying to find another DAC to compare it to. After all I’m not going to compare the M8 to a full desktop DAC, and the other i-Devices DAC I have around (Solo -R, Solo Original, Fostex HP-P1 doesn’t support USB DACs). The Solo -dB works as a USB DAC and would make for a good comparison, but I don’t have the -dB version at the moment. One i-Devices that I have that support USB DAC functions is the Sony PHA-1 and just for old times’ sake I threw in the original Dacport CX (with the headphone amp built in, not the LX). Lastly I threw in Fostex’s HP-A3 just to have another frame of reference.

 

centrance_m8

Sony PHA-1

The Sony possessing a slightly smaller width but much better depth for a much more spacious sound stage around and better three dimensionality. Clean grainless sound, better midrange bloom. The M8 is more linear with less midrange bloom but also less coloration. Better low bass performance, better articulation. More grain and less smooth.

Dacport CX

The Dacport, like the Sony, has a much better sound stage depth and also a slightly smaller sound stage width than the M8 (and also the PHA-1). Like the Sony, the Dacport is cleaner and has less grain, better three dimensionality. More mid-centric, weakest in the low bass among the four compared here. Some congestion in the midrange.

Fostex HP-A3

The HP-A3 is the superior DAC in the comparison here possessing the blackest background, most spacious sound and three dimensionality and also being the smoothest sounding DAC of the four compared.

 

END WORDS

My sound impressions reminded me of my listening session in Japan when I met Michael Goodman at the Headphone Festival. The set up then was using the M8 with an Ipod and a Beyerdynamic T1. The M8 certainly has a monster of an amp but I didn’t really get a good chance to evaluate the sound, simply because the T1 was an open back and the backdrop of the headphone show has a fairly high noise level. It was the same linear, moderately dark sound with good instrument separation and articulation. I missed some factors like flow and coherence, and most importantly sound stage depth. The grain in the sound is also quite bothersome even with headphones like the LCD-3 that by itself is one of the most grain-free headphones around. I thought that the sound, though more articulate than the Dacport CX, didn’t quite have the coherence and three dimensionality of the Dacport CX.

Centrance definitely has put a lot of time into the M8, and the long delays from when the M8 was first announced (some 1+ year ago?) definitely shows as it come out to be a well designed and well engineered product. You have some six different configurations to choose from, all encased in a well-built enclosure with practically all the interfaces you may need. This product is definitely an enthusiast’s first in terms of design (who else would provide an option for a 4-pin XLR and 2×3-pin XLRs?). The sound, however, while technically very proficient, seems to lack a certain flow, midrange bloom, depth, and coherence that somehow I didn’t quite enjoy with the different headphones and IEMs I used for this impression. It may just be my ears. I definitely see a lot of reason to why the M8 would be a successful product in the market.

The Headfonia Store has placed an order for the M8 through a local Centrance distributor and so I’ll be expecting to be selling a few of these in the next few months. At the same time we’re also waiting for the ADL X1 to arrive so when the two arrive then I can have a better comparison of the two. And who knows, maybe Fostex has an HP-P2 in the works as well.

 

Some photos from the Japan festival:

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64 Comments

  • Reply August 5, 2013

    Michael Goodman

    Thanks for a mini-review, Michael! Your opinion is important to us.

    HiFi-M8 LX works with any optical input and supports up to 24/192 on both USB input and optical input. Please ask the customer to contact us and we will fix the issues they are having.

    In total, HiFi-M8 comes in eight models, offering a variety of output choices. There is also a long HiFi-M8 discussion on head-fi, where most users agree that it sounds superior to competition. And as far as output level, there is no competition!

    It was nice to see you in Tokyo and I’m looking forward to seeing you again soon.

    Michael Goodman
    CEntrance

    • Reply August 7, 2013

      ohm image

      This is true. I only had the chance to briefly demo the M8 at a couple of different Tokyo audio shows, but each time I was amazed at what it can produce.

      Specifically, its ability to tweak output impedance has an immediate effect, especially for low Ω earphones. The bigger bass heard with a setting of 11Ω is probably high bass, in the region of 80-150Hz, which is one of a few typical reactions earphones and headphones can have when encountering impedances which are higher than their dampening factor.

      The options are myriad with this amp and the build quality is top-notch. I think that everyone here is looking forward to its official debut.

    • Reply August 7, 2013

      Mike

      Thank you for stopping by Michael and congratulations on the M8. Lots of positive response on it!

  • Reply August 6, 2013

    Concerned Citizen

    Thanks for taking the time to write this. Just a few things:
    1) Was the DAC comparison with another amp? Was you using the LCD-3s?
    2) Did you use a PC as a digital stream for all devices?
    3) Surely, it would be alright to compare to relatively priced standalone DACs?
    4) Would be interesting to see a comparison of its amp section.
    5) And I think you meant DACport LX.

    Regards
    Concerned Citizen

    • Reply August 7, 2013

      Mike

      1. No I used the built in amp on each DAC units. With LCD-3s and the other headphones mentioned. 2. Mac for all.
      3. Yes I used the Fostex HP-A3. Didn’t really have a $600 DAC/Amp unit around so that’s the closest thing I have. 4. Yes
      5. Actually the CX, the one with the amp built in.

      Thanks

      • Reply August 8, 2013

        Michael Goodman

        Note: The regular DACport has the headphone amp built in. There is no “DACport CX”. DACmini CX does exist, but I’m not sure Mike has one.

        • Reply August 9, 2013

          Mike

          Sorry I thought the Dacport with the amp is called the CX.

          I only have the Dacports but not the Dacmini.

  • Reply August 6, 2013

    Jeffrey Coleman

    I’m one of the iDevice pre-order guys, and this review makes me yearn even more for it. I have to admit, I’ve been tempted to switch to an LX model. But it seems DAP choices are quite limited. I know the two A&K models have mini Toslink. But for the life of me, I can’t think of another. I’m grey on the specs of the HiFiMan HM901. And maybe the future FiiO X5 will include it, but who really knows that.

    Am I forgetting another DAP option?

    • Reply August 6, 2013

      dalethorn

      When I look at the full capability of the M8, not only for hires music tracks, but to be able to tune impedance, gain, use battery to eliminate AC line noise, possibly tune up an imperfect bass or treble, support balanced operation etc. …. you have to get beyond i-devices to explore most of this. I’ve tried i-device DACs like the HRT istreamer and v-moda Verza, and am not too impressed. They’re better than nothing, but it’s really limiting.

      • Reply August 7, 2013

        ohm image

        The CLAS really is an incredible unit, but of course limited in that it requires an external amp. I’ve found its output to equal rather higher-end desktop DACs- depending, of course, on what amp it is plugged into.

        Interestingly, the CLAS works great with CENTRANCE’ amazing DACmini. I expect for headphone users the M8 will obviate the need for a CLAS/Amp system.

        • Reply August 7, 2013

          George Lai

          One key attribute of the CLAS in the few months I’ve owned it is that each and every time it connects to the iPod and iPhone faultlessly. From what I’ve read in the head-fi forums, that can’t be said for the PHA-1, HP-P1, Venturecraft etc, where occasionally you need to reboot for want of a better word. Perhaps it is because those are both iOS and Android-capable and that probably complicates the iOS/Android switching process.

          • Reply August 7, 2013

            dalethorn

            Thanks for confirming that. It really is frustrating sometimes.

          • Reply August 7, 2013

            L.

            My CLAS actually regularly acts up connecting

            • Reply August 7, 2013

              George Lai

              L, then I count my blessings.

              • Reply August 7, 2013

                L.

                Hahaha. thanks!

            • Reply August 7, 2013

              Jeffrey Coleman

              Once my power up routine went iDevice -> CLAS db (listen for connection chirp) -> amp, all my connection hiccups went away…

              • Reply August 7, 2013

                Mike

                Thanks for all the comments. I’m out of town and having problems with the internet connection, even for retrieving emails. Will get back to the comments as soon as I get reliable internet.

          • Reply August 7, 2013

            Mike

            At the store we have people come in with all sorts of different iPod/Iphone versions and the PHA-1 seems to be the one having the least hiccup that I don’t remember ever seeing it having connection problem. And the Fostex HP-P1 also.

        • Reply August 7, 2013

          Mike

          You mean CLAS + Dacmini amp?

          • Reply August 7, 2013

            ohm image

            Indeed I do. The DACmini works amazingly well with the iPad and computer, but not so well with a non-jailbreaked iPhone so I tend to put a CLAS in between. I assume the line out capability of the M8 to be as good, if not better, but I’ve not had the chance to compare and measure the two back to back.

            • Reply August 7, 2013

              Mike

              Interesting information.

      • Reply August 7, 2013

        Mike

        Yes its incredible what you get with the M8.

    • Reply August 7, 2013

      Mike

      There is an old i-river that provides optical out.

      Other than that, nothing else that I know of.

    • Reply August 8, 2013

      Jeffrey Coleman

      I guess the Ibasso DX100 (HDP-R10) also has optical out, so that’s one more. But I’ve yet to see a current DAP, with optical, and be more “budget” friendly…

  • Reply August 7, 2013

    dalethorn

    I just wanted to note here that I’ve already pointed to this review from a few other places – the configuration options that this review describes are important reading, and I hope they set the standard for other manufacturers. And as George Lai noted here, more flexibility can mean more ambiguity that the amps have to resolve, so here’s hoping those problems go away at the same time.

  • Reply August 9, 2013

    Lord Victor Halgaard

    Just curious, any idea how much power this has compared to the ALO Rx Mk3b? For example how well would it drive something like the HE-6 comparably? 🙂

    • Reply August 9, 2013

      Mike

      That’s a good question and I should be able to compare it if I have the two side by side.
      However from the review of the Mk3B I know that the Rx can drive a HE6 better than the M8 can drive the K1000. And from experience the K1000 is easier to drive than the HE-6.

  • Reply August 10, 2013

    Brian Werner

    Mike is the iOS compatible HifiM8 compatible with the new Lightning connector? In the website literature it doesn’t appear to be but doesn’t explicitly exclude it so I wasn’t sure if you knew. I have two 5th gen iPods that I use for portable music so no bigge but I was curious…. I wouldn’t really want to strap something like this to my iPhone 5 anyway. But as far as I am aware, Cypher Labs Solo -R is and the VModa Verza is….. Is the Sony PHA-1 lightning compatible? Any plans to review the Sony anytime soon?

    • Reply August 10, 2013

      Jeffrey Coleman

      It is going to be lightning compatible, but the included cable is going to be 30 pin.

      • Reply August 10, 2013

        Brian Werner

        So all I’d need to do is source a shorty USB to lightning line out cable and I’d be in good shape… right?

        If that is the case this things is starting to look like a really, really good one box solution. My only worry was how future proof it was if it was relying on the old 30 pin protocol.

        NICE!

        • Reply August 10, 2013

          dalethorn

          The i-devices that have lightning connectors have the same digital data stream as the 30-pin devices, and the i-devices that have lightning connectors and the 30-adapter with the DAC chip have the same analog data stream as the 30-pin devices. What I don’t know right now is whether there are any Apple accessories/adapters that contain a DAC chip that do not have the 30-pin connector on the end opposite the lightning end.

          • Reply August 10, 2013

            George Lai

            Hi Dale, good question. I’ve always wondered why the Lightning plus DAC cannot end in a 3.5mm. Right now, to get analog into my headphone amp, I have to use the Apple lightning-30pin adapter as well as a 30pin-3.5mm cable. (Oh wait, there is. It’s called a CLAS. Just joking of course).

            • Reply August 10, 2013

              dalethorn

              I see in the Apple store that there are more options with the Lightning-to-whatever, such as Lightning-to-miniUSB adapter. But, I don’t know if that particular adapter includes a DAC chip, since the purpose of that cable is probably not to carry analog audio. I know that companies making Apple-compatible DACs pay Apple a bunch to get the license to access the USB data, but I don’t know whether it would be feasible for any of those companies to pay essentially the same fee just to be able to issue an adapter with a 3.5 mm mini-plug on the end. Because they would have to put the DAC chip and who knows what else into those adapters.

              • Reply August 10, 2013

                George Lai

                Although there would be a market for a premium lightning-to-3.5mm with a quality DAC chip inside. Something like an Audioquest Dragonfly shape and similar pricing would have a good market I reckon.

          • Reply August 10, 2013

            Brian Werner

            That was kinda what I was getting at Dale. The lightning protocol won’t open up the digital stream unless it receives an authentication “handshake” from a proprietary usb chip like is embedded in the 30 pin adapter (which kicks analog out so isn’t of any use) I wasn’t clear on whether or not the M8 has that chip inside the case or if Centrance has outfitted buyers with a cable with that licensed chip in it… Otherwise it can read the 1 and 0’s but can’t gain access to them. VModa’s dock is proprietary and I can’t imagine that Cypher Labs is going to sell their ‘-R” cable with the unlock on its own….

            • Reply August 10, 2013

              George Lai

              Hi Brian. Both my CLAS-R and HRT iStreamer works with my iPhone 5 so I believe the handshake is done in the CLAS and the HRT and is independent of the cable. Unless I’m misunderstanding something …

        • Reply August 11, 2013

          Jeffrey Coleman

          Yes, all you need is a cable. But keep this in mind; IOS7 will introduce a function where it will resist non-authorized accessories to be used. I don’t know to what extent the “resistance” will be. But still keep this in mind when shopping for your cable/accessory. There are plenty of short lightning cables out there, but so few are Apple certified. It might be a big deal, or maybe not. Just something to keep in mind…

          • Reply August 13, 2013

            Brian Werner

            I finally got to the bottom of it… Mike Goodman did develop it with lightning compatibility (had to verify myself) That is why there are two models. He wanted to offer high resolution and SPDIF but also wanted to offer both old and new Apple… He couldn’t get all that into the same box because of power related issues so opted to split the model into two….

            Comparing this against the landscape…. single box solution wise it is the most complete. Alpha Design Labs X1, Sony PHA 1, VModa Verza and Fostex HP-P1 are all severely under powered in the amplifier section (like 80mw to 120mw into 32 ohm) whereas the Centrance has 1400mw on tap.

            So it’s really is in a class by itself… the only comparable portable solution would be a Cypher Labs Dac mounted to a strong dedicated amp. But still doesn’t have the resistance matching, gain and tone controls like this one.

            Damnit I was happy with what I had!

            • Reply August 14, 2013

              Mike

              Thanks for sharing, Brian.

  • Reply August 10, 2013

    George Lai

    The one shown in your picture is the 4-pin XLR and there is also a 4-pin RSA and a combo XLR, ignoring the pro version. Could you enlighten me on which pins are most common for the higher end headphones? Thanks.

    • Reply August 12, 2013

      Mike

      Big headphones, full sizes usually use the 4-pin XLR since 1. they are more sturdy and 2. can accomodate bigger cables.
      IEMs, usually 4-pin RSA.

      • Reply August 12, 2013

        George Lai

        Thanks Mike. Nice to know if I get the M8 🙂

  • Reply August 12, 2013

    George Lai

    Bump – The one shown in your picture is the 4-pin XLR and there is also a 4-pin RSA and a combo XLR, ignoring the pro version. Could you enlighten me on which pins are most common for the higher end headphones? Thanks.

  • Reply August 14, 2013

    Ryan

    How does the M8 compare to the Just Audio AHA in terms of power and overall sound quality? What would you say is superior?

    • Reply August 14, 2013

      Mike

      Well I don’t have the two to compare side by side, but the AHA is smoother and warmer. The M8 definitely more powerful, darker, and more laid back.

  • Reply August 15, 2013

    l3A7VA7VA

    I have the Hifi-M8 idevice unit and it is certainly a step up from my Fostex hp_p1.
    I look forward to the future full review.

  • Reply August 17, 2013

    George Lai

    I had a short listen to the M8 (combo XLR version) and what dissuaded me was the ergonomics. If you use a short length 30pin/lightning to USB cable, your iDevice is “upside down” so to speak, the switches on the back for on/off, impedance, gain, bass, treble etc are not only very small and fiddly but I couldn’t really hear the impedance/bass/treble effects. It seems very light for its size and I believe the size was made to accommodate XLR or RSA sockets when I’d rather have a larger battery and just 3.5mm/6mm output jacks. Just my two cents worth. I’ll stick with my CLAS-R and the option of thin/fat/big/small amps for the time being.

    • Reply August 19, 2013

      Mike

      Thanks for sharing, George.

  • Reply August 27, 2013

    l3A7VA7VA

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJMqRecJG9U

    Jude from head-fi has just done a great video review of the Hifi-m8 and LX also.

  • Reply September 2, 2013

    George Lai

    • Reply September 2, 2013

      Mike

      Crazy everyone is building the next generation iDevices DACs. Just when I’m about to publish my opinion on iDevices DACs.

      • Reply September 2, 2013

        George Lai

        Well, there’s a LOT of us Apple fanboys, Mike. One half of Mike Goodman (Centrance) believes in Apple whilst David Maudlin (Cypherlabs) has gone over to the dark side by catering to Android now. Cypherlabs should take a leaf from Centrance. I don’t want to pay for Android capability when I won’t use it. Ditto the USB DAC function. He should have built a Solo-R with amp built in (Duo-R perhaps?).

      • Reply September 4, 2013

        dalethorn

        I haven’t been impressed so far, although I haven’t heard them all. I was appaled by the iStreamer – it improved the sound a little, but was too messy – too many parts to connect together.

  • Reply September 2, 2013

    Ben Brown

    Glad to be able to sit here listening to my system with an HP-A3 in smug contentment. I still hold that no portable situation is worth the highest fidelity due to ambient noise and vibrations, but it’s good to see the market growing for what I would consider more a ‘transportable’ rig for use in hotels and the like. Personally I have a Raspberry Pi music server for that…

    • Reply September 2, 2013

      Mike

      A Rasberry Pi server for a transportable rig?

      • Reply September 2, 2013

        Ben Brown

        Well, I connect the Pi to my USB DAC of choice (obviously size can vary here) and then I have it set up to create a wifi network so I can connect a phone or tablet to it and then control the music playback from the internal storage using an app.
        It needs to be connected to USB power (or a battery pack, I suppose) but as I said I don’t really intend to use it on the go, just for when I want to have music but don’t want to take a laptop. Depending on DACs it can work out at a comparable size to a HIFI-M8/phone rig but cheaper and obviously a bit harder to set up. I’ve had great fun with it though and it sounds great.

        • Reply September 3, 2013

          Mike

          That sounds very complicated though bad-ass. 🙂

  • Reply November 8, 2013

    thethirty3rd

    Hi, I know this is sort of apples to oranges, but how does the overall SQ of the M8 compare with, say, an AK100mk2/RWAK100? I have an M8 but am considering getting a portable player for on-the-go use.

    • Reply November 8, 2013

      Mike

      Aside from the sound signature difference (AK generally more forward than the M8), the Centrance gives a bigger sound.

  • Reply March 21, 2014

    Eugen

    I have a DACport that I used for some years now and I love it. But I want something with a battery that’s also an upgrade to my DACport.

    Now, my DACport has some noise when adjusting volume, nothing major but it’s a niggle. I don’t trust small potentiometers, especially if they’re 4gang pots like you need for a balanced dac/amp like the HifiM8.

    This really should have a digitally controlled analogue volume control. It would have meant way better tracking especially at low volume, better reliability, an easy to implement balance control, the option to display the actual attenuation in dB etc.

    I can’t say anything about it’s sound quality and power except that I find the DACport exactly as you describe it (low bass not as controlled as I’d want, 10ohm impedance too low for some headphones, slight hardness in the lower highs) so maybe the HifiM8 is sonically what I’d like as you seem to think it doesn’t have those traits.

    What I would really like is a HifM8 that has a microphone input with phantom power inside (so one of those combo XLR’s can be switched to mic input). That would be awesome and maybe the last audio interface most people would ever need in their life. Call it the ProM8 Centrance. And dump the volume pot. 🙂

    • Reply March 21, 2014

      dalethorn

      Did you ask any of the musical instrument dealers about headphone amps that have a pro microphone input? I buy things from Sweetwater in Ft. Wayne IN, U.S. – but it seems most of what they carry isn’t intended to mix pro mic inputs with an audiophile headphone DAC/amp, let alone an i-device compatible amp.

      • Reply March 21, 2014

        Eugen

        AFAIK there’s just the Sound Devices USBPre2 but that’s half a kilo and it doesn’t have a battery. It can be used with an USB battery pack but that puts it waay over the “always keep in your bag” weight class.

        If I can’t have a battery and and even better amp section that the DACport (which is the only portable thing I’ve used so far that can reasonably drive a HD600), I’ll just keep the DACport / MICport dynamic duo. 🙂

        I don’t know what to think about the HifiM8. There’s no question it’s better than the DACport but is it really approaching a good desktop dac/amp?

        PS: I see now that CEntrance themselves are launching the MixerFace (is RME the Apple of audio interfaces?). It looks great I have to say. Maybe the DACport / MICport will leave and the next class up will take their place.

        I’m still wary about all those volume pots. I’ve had problems with analogue pots on my CEC HD53n, on my Dayens Ampino and the DACport. It’s getting to the point that if it’s not made by Headroom, it’ll have problems with a bad volume pot. 🙂

        • Reply March 23, 2014

          dalethorn

          I’ve read suggestions about cleaning analog volume controls years ago. Even some other controls serviced by knobs. As long as you can open the case, pull the knob off, and get some electronics cleaner into the proper area, and make sure any lubrication that’s necessary is applied, it should work. There aren’t many things I clean these days – Sennheiser 600 series cable to earcup connectors are one of those things.

    • Reply March 21, 2014

      Vinisia

      http://centrance.com/products/mixerface/ Just throwing this out there 🙂

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