Review: Plussound X8 Tri-Copper – World Premiere!

PlusSound X8 Tri-Copper

Disclaimer: The PlusSound X8 Tri-Copper was provided free of charge for this review. PlusSound is not affiliated with Headfonia, they are not site advertisers. Many thanks for the opportunity and generosity!

About PlusSound

PlusSound is an American company seated in Los Angeles that specialized in aftermarket cables but has also dipped their toes into the portable amplifier market. Recently PlusSound has also launched their new universal IEM lineup. We have covered the Prism already. PlusSound‘s latest product-introduction was of a series of Bluetooth IEM and headphone cables.
PlusSound has made its debut in early 2012 and has gained a lot of respect and interest for their outstanding products by the community.

Ordering from PlusSound is pretty neat and easy. You can go to their website, select the type of cable you want and customize the materials, terminations and even the Y-splitter and chin-slider. As like most other cable-manufacturers PlusSound also provides you the opportunity to color-code your left and right side connectors on top you can also decide what color the logo on the termination should be. We have covered some of their cables already in the past.

The Exo cable has been double awarded as best accessory and best cable (best value) last year.

We’re happy to bring you a world-premiere with the X8 Tri-Copper from Plussound!

PlusSound X8 Tri-Copper

PlusSound X8 Tri-Copper

About X8 Tri-Copper

The X8 is PlusSound’s flagship IEM cable series. You can find all their offerings in there in eight-wire configuration. The Tri-Copper is a newly constructed wire by PlusSound. It features three different types of copper conductors per wire – pure copper, silver plated copper and gold plated copper. The aim of this cable was to offer a completely different signature to any existing Plussound cable. It was created to feature an open, smooth and punchy signature with soft treble. We will see if that mission was completed successfully in the sound section.

The new wire-construction though is not the only development by PlusSound that found its way into the X8. With their freshly baked PS Insulation they are now offering a proprietary insulation, which also is supposed to alter the sound of each cable for the better. It has been in the works since mid 2017 and is now offered as standard with all new PlusSound cables. I have had a few cables by PlusSound in my hands, and though I consider all of them flexible, the PS Insulation is very noticeably more comfortable and flexible. For an eight-wire cable it is incredible and sets the bar very high for any new cable at the HFN headquarters. So hats off to that!

An X8 Tri-Copper will set you back 1099.99 US Dollars, standard build-time for one set currently is eight weeks.

PlusSound X8 Tri-Copper

PlusSound X8 Tri-Copper

Package

When you order a cable from PlusSound you will get a magnetic cardboard box. It’s a rather subtle box and kept in dark colours. It also has been redesigned for this year and now features a paper sleeve with a cable-graphic on top of it. If you pay close attention you will see that this printed cable even has the PS-logo in its connectors – neat. At the bottom you can find the instruction manual for the cable. This part previously was supplied in the packaging as a card. Now I feel it has become rather difficult to read with black printing on an almost black background. Maybe PlusSound will provide the manual card again. Maybe it was just missing in my sample.

Also supplied in the packaging of course is your new cable, which is in a shrink wrapped plastic bag. Additionally to that you will be given an amplifier strap band. This probably is because of the Cloud Nine amplifier they also offer. Packaging overall is pretty standard for an aftermarket cable.

PlusSound X8 Tri-Copper

PlusSound X8 Tri-Copper

Build quality

I have always been a fan of the PlusSound build quality. They are simple, elegant and very well built. X8 is no exception. The 2.5 Millimeter gold plated plug is covered with a black heat-shrink that has PlusSound’s logo in copper colour on it. The heat-shrink is exactly placed on the plug. As mentioned before, the flexibility is outstanding. The braiding of all eight wires is accomplished in great manner and perfection. I have not chosen the components, apart for the termination, of the X8 cable, but I think PlusSound knows that I really digg the rose-gold aluminium Y-split. Since it’s the third time now that it is on any of my cables. The split is robust, elegant and surprisingly light-weight. It doesn’t pull down the cable with too much force or weight. The chin-slider, just like on my T-metal Exo cable, is a silver piece of aluminium. It certainly does what it is supposed to.

PlusSound X8 Tri-Copper

PlusSound X8 Tri-Copper

After the Y-split the cable separates into four wires per channel. Now the wires are twisted around each other, forming one bigger wire. This has the advantage that it doesn’t give any room for discomfort, especially near the area that will wrap around your ear. The 2-pin connectors are made of metal and are again covered with black heat-shrink. Depending on your choice for each channel the inwards facing PS logo will be colored accordingly. Mine are blue for the left side and red for right. If you’re familiar with PlusSound’s cables you know that they don’t use any form of ear-hook per se. They simply use a little bit of heat-shrink after the connectors to give the wires a guide how to move. I love this solution as it gives best comfort.

The cable itself is flexible, very ergonomic and transmits absolutely no friction noise and doesn’t pick up any interference or electrical hum, if that’s what you’re concerned. It simply is perfect.

Page two is all about Sound and Pair-ups!

Review: Plussound X8 Tri-Copper – World Premiere!
4.4 (88.89%) 27 votes

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A daytime code monkey with a passion for audio and his kids, Linus tends to look at gear with a technical approach, trying to understand why certain things sound the way they do. When there is no music around, Linus goes the extra mile and annoys the hell out of his colleagues with low level beatboxing.

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