Shure SRH-840: Conclusion

shure_srh840_1

After many more hours on the SRH-840, my impressions have been growing more and more positive. I’ve been using the SRH-840 with three of the newest portable amp on the market: The RSA Shadow, the ALO Rx, and the TTVJ Slim. On a desktop set up, with the Grace M902 and the WooAudio6, the Shure is just as fun sounding. The SRH-840 has this ability to blend nicely and adapt to a wide range of amplifiers and music.

Coupled to the RSA Shadow, the SRH-840 presents a nice and clean instrument separation. On live recordings, the SRH-840 very nicely differentiates different instruments on the stage. Listening to Alicia Keys Unplugged, for instance, Alicia’s voice remains close and intimate, while the background singers, the piano, and the audience clapping all take an appropriate distance. Playing Yanni’s Live At the Santorini, the sound is big and spacious, exactly what you’d expect from a Yanni live performance, and yet still every instrument is nicely separated. Very nice indeed.

When you feed bigger portable amps to the SRH-840, the sound grows appropriately. I’ve been listening more and more to the SRH-840 with the TTVJ Slim and the ALO Rx. The SRH-840 already has a potential for playing vocal, and combined with the TTVJ Slim that has a great midrange, the combination becomes sublime for playing vocal and if you’re looking for an intimate presentation. With the ALO Rx, the SRH-840 has an expansive soundstage and great dynamics, and is currently my favorite for listening classical music when I’m away from the HD800 set up.

If the HD800 is my current favorite high end headphone, then the SRH-840 is my current favorite for when I’m not using the HD800. Unlike the HD800 that needs a high end set up to truly shine, the SRH-840 works well with just about everything, it has become one of my favorite headphone for reviewing an amplifier. The SRH-840 after 300+ hours becomes a very neutral phone. The frequency is flat, with just a small lift in the treble. This small treble lift gives a nice sparkle and airy sound. Of course when the recording is bad, you will get some sibilance, but I really don’t want to blame a nice headphone if the fault is actually in the recording.

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20 Comments

  • has the sibilance improved

  • Reply March 10, 2011

    Stephenmacks

    i have just bought these and so far i like them more than my grado sr125i

    • Reply March 10, 2011

      Anonymous

      They are indeed very nice, and more well-balanced than the SR125i.

  • Reply March 11, 2011

    Donunus

    300 hours? Oh no! I might have sold mine too fast at 100 hours. I thought they sounded too dry and the midbass was a little chunky and imprecise typical of closed headphones. Does that change from 100 to 300 hours? I am now wondering if I should get another one or whether it was just not my cup of tea and no burn in could change what I would think of them? hmm

  • Reply September 23, 2011

    Alf

    how bout srh440

  • Reply October 23, 2011

    DodgersKings323

    Well that certainly makes things interesting………..they’re $70 cheaper than the HD-25 with similar isolation? Better soundstage and i would much prefer an over ear phone. + Foldable for portability

  • Reply November 24, 2011

    DodgersKings323

    Hey Mike what percentage of the 840 do you think the 440 give? And what percentage of the HD800 do you think the 840 give?

  • Reply December 21, 2011

    Jess

    Excellent reviews man. Was considering purchasing a pair sometime soon, but now I definitely will! I am sure I will be back to post my thanks after 1+, 50+ and 300+ hours of listening myself 🙂

    • Reply December 21, 2011

      Mike

      Hi Jess, 
      This was my very old way of doing a review. Glad  you enjoy it. 🙂 

  • Reply June 12, 2012

    Jack Knight

    is it the same character with goldring dr150?

  • Reply January 7, 2013

    Pkrdlr

    Mike, A belated happy new year. I picked up the SRH-840 that you recommended to me and like them very much, not at the 300 hr. burn in yet but getting there. I now have $ 250 max for an amp and dac either separates or combo, portable or desktop. Music is classical and acoustic flac files from my HP mini netbook. Thx, Rick

    • Reply January 7, 2013

      Mike

      You’re welcome, Rick!

      • Reply January 7, 2013

        Pkrdlr

        Mike, So what combo / seperates do you recommend for the SRH-840’s per my post ?. Thx, Rick

  • Reply January 8, 2013

    Pkrdlr

    Mike, So what combo / separates do you recommend for the SRH-840’s per my post ?. Thx, Rick

  • Reply January 25, 2013

    Pkrdlr

    Hi Mike, Current rig is Topping D1 2 + Shure srh-840 + Laptop. The 840’s sound great for Jazz, Instrumentals, and Acoustics. Looking for a couple recommendations to pair up with the Topping D1 2 for 60 – 70’s Rock. My budget is $200 usd. Thanks, Rick

    • Reply January 25, 2013

      dalethorn

      The SRH840 seems like a nice more or less neutral sound with a mild upper bass emphasis and some fairly strong output around 8 to 10 khz. It looks like a good candidate to be replaced with a Beyer DT770-32LE. Better bass, and more detail above that. Maybe slightly above budget, but worth the extra dedication.

      • Reply January 25, 2013

        Pkrdlr

        dalethorn, Thanks for your reply. I’m not looking to replace the 840’s but to compliment them with a headphone to pair with the Topping D1 2 for 60-70’s rock.

        • Reply January 25, 2013

          dalethorn

          I have a lot of 60s and 70s rock. The tracks I have play well with a variety of headphones, and I’m thinking it’s more a flavor choice than anything. With a good DAC and rock music I wouldn’t want a bright headphone or one that has a light bass. The ATH ESW9a I have is good that way and exactly $200. Better sound (especially bass) than the B&W P5 or v-moda M80.

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